WCS North America

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Identifying impediments to long-distance mammal migrations
Author(s): Seidler, R.G., Long, R.A., Berger, J., Bergen, S., and J.P. Beckmann
Year: 2014
Description/Abstract: In much of the world, the persistence of long-distance migrations by mammals is threatened by development. Even where human population density is relatively low, there are roads, fencing, and energy development that present barriers to animal movement. In order to conserve species that rely on long-distance migration, it is critical to identify existing migration impediments. This paper applies movement models to high-frequency locations of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem to describe the stopover sites associated with anthropogenic development. The findings demonstrate the importance of minimizing development in migration corridors in the future and of mitigating existing pressure on migratory animals by removing barriers, reducing the development footprint, or installing crossing structures.
Journal/Source: Conservation Biology
Full Citation: Seidler, R.G., Long, R.A., Berger, J., Bergen, S., and J.P. Beckmann (2014). “Identifying impediments to long-distance mammal migrations.” Conservation Biology 29(1):99-109.
Moving beyond science to protect a mammalian migration corridor
Author(s): Berger, J. and S.L. Cain
Year: 2014
Description/Abstract: As the discipline of conservation biology evolves and practitioners grow increasingly concerned about how to put results into achievable conservation, it is still unclear the extent to which science drives conservation outcomes, especially across rural landscapes. This paper examines the role of science in the protection of a biological corridor for the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) of the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.
Journal/Source: Conservation Biology
Full Citation: Berger, J. and S.L. Cain. (2014). “Moving beyond science to protect a mammalian migration corridor.” Conservation Biology 28(5): 1142-1150.
Trophic interactions and dynamic herbivore responses to snowpack
Author(s): Brodie, J.F., Post, E., Berger, J., and F. Watson
Year: 2014
Description/Abstract: Trophic interactions and population structure can shape how climate change influences ecosystems by modifying herbivore responses to environmental conditions. Predation can influence herbivore behaviour and demography, but how changes in predation and population structure affect herbivore distribution across abiotic gradients remains little known. This study assesses whether predators altered the response of different age and sex classes of a dominant ungulate herbivore to changing abiotic conditions.
Journal/Source: Climate Change Responses
Full Citation: Brodie, J.F., Post, E., Berger, J., and F. Watson (2014). “Trophic interactions and dynamic herbivore responses to snowpack.” Climate Change Responses 1(4).
Wildlife and energy development - Pronghorn of the Upper Green River Basin - Final Report
Author(s): Jon Beckmann, Renee Seidler, Joel Berger
Year: 2011
Journal/Source: NA
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society, North America Program
Full Citation: Wildlife & energy development: Pronghorn of the Upper Green River Basin
Wildlife and Energy Development - Pronghorn of the Upper Green River Basin – Year 1 Summary
Author(s): Berger, J., K. Murray Berger, and J. Beckmann
Year: 2006
Description/Abstract: This annual report summarizes the results of the Upper Green River Basin pronghorn study for 2005, including the winter 2004-05. Major issues addressed include seasonal movements, distribution, and migration, factors which affect pronghorn winter distribution, and pronghorn survival and productivity correlates.
Full Citation: Berger, J., K. Murray Berger, and J. Beckmann. 2006. Wildlife and Energy Development: Pronghorn of the Upper Green River Basin – Year 1 Summary. Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.
Culturally-based Wildlife Conservation on Native American Lands - A Challenge of Scale and Governance
Author(s): Matthews, S.M, Higley, J. M., Hilty, J.A. and Wang, K. Eds. Redford, K. H., and Grippo, C.
Year: 2008
Description/Abstract: The Hupa people living on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation now have management rights to their lands. In assuming management responsibilities, the tribe has worked diligently to develop a better understanding of the needs of threatened, endangered, and culturally significant wildlife and plant species. The need to fill information gaps for such species has led the Hoopa Tribe to cultivate a collaborative relationship with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in order to develop management recommendations for the imperiled, culturally significant, and forest-dependent fisher (Martes pennanti).
Full Citation: Matthews, S.M, Higley, J. M., Hilty, J.A. and Wang, K. 2008. Culturally-based Wildlife Conservation on Native American Lands: A Challenge of Scale and Governance, in Redford, K.H. and Grippo, C.,eds. Protected Areas, Governance, and Scale. WCS Working Paper No. 36. 2008.
Wildlife and Private Lands in Island Park, Idaho
Author(s): Heidi Kretser
Year: 2010
Description/Abstract: This survey addresses private landowners’ attitudes toward wildlife, planning and land use in the Island Park, Idaho. This is an independent research effort not connected to the county planning office or any on-going land- use planning efforts. However, the results will be provided to those working in the region and may be used to inform development and wildlife conservation efforts on private lands.
Publisher: WCS and Cornell University w/ funding from the Brainerd Foundation
Full Citation: Kretser, H. Wildlife and Private Lands in Island Park, Idaho. A survey of landowners. 2010
Montana, the Last Best Place - Maintaining wildlife and private lands in the Big Sky
Author(s): Heidi Kretser
Description/Abstract: This survey addresses private landowners’ attitudes toward wildlife, planning and land use in the Big Sky, Montana. This is an independent research effort not connected to the county planning office or any on-going land- use planning efforts. However, the results will be provided to those working in the region and may be used to inform development and wildlife conservation efforts on private lands.
Montana, the Last Best Place - Maintaining wildlife and private lands in the Big Hole
Author(s): Heidi Kretser
Year: 2010
Description/Abstract: This questionnaire addresses private landowners’ attitudes toward wildlife, planning and land use in the Big Hole, Montana. This is an independent research effort not connected to the county planning office or any on-going land- use planning efforts. However, the results will be provided to those working in the region and may be used to inform development and wildlife conservation efforts on private lands.
Publisher: WCS and Cornell University w/ funding from the Brainerd Foundation
Full Citation: Kretser, H. Montana, the Last Best Place: Maintaining wildlife and private lands in the Big Hole. A survey of landowners. 2010
2009 WCS Greater Yellowstone Wolverine Program Progress Report
Author(s): Robert Inman, Mark Packila, Kris Inman, Bryan Aber, Rob Spence, Deborah McCauley
Year: 2009
Description/Abstract: This annual report summarizes the conservation work and outcomes of the WCS Greater Yellowstone Wolverine Program in 2009.
Publisher: WCS
Full Citation: Robert Inman, Mark Packila, Kris Inman, Bryan Aber, Rob Spence, Deborah McCauley. WCS Greater Yellowstone Wolverine Program Progress Report. 2009
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