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Optimism and challenge for science-based conservation of migratory species in and out of U.S. national parks
Author(s): Berger, J., Cain, S.L., Cheng, E., Dratch, P., Ellison, K., Francis, J., Frost, H.C., Gende, S., Groves, C., Karesh, W.A., Leslie, E., Machlis, G., Medellin, R.A., Noss, R.F., Redford, K.H., Soukup, M., Wilcove, D., and S. Zack
Year: 2014
Description/Abstract: Public agencies sometimes seek outside guidance when capacity to achieve their mission is limited. In 2008, the U.S. National Park Service (NPS) sought help from outside researchers while developing an action plan to conserve aerial, marine, and terrestrial populations of migrating wildlife. Although migration is an ecological process central to maintaining biological diversity, addressing NPS’s request required these individuals to consider attitudes and behaviors of individuals, society, and agencies. The questions, challenges, and potential solutions they present are relevant to many agencies other than NPS in which natural resource managers must grapple with extensive movements and migration of wild animals.
Journal/Source: Conservation Biology
Full Citation: Berger, J., Cain, S.L., Cheng, E., Dratch, P., Ellison, K., Francis, J., Frost, H.C., Gende, S., Groves, C., Karesh, W.A., Leslie, E., Machlis, G., Medellin, R.A., Noss, R.F., Redford, K.H., Soukup, M., Wilcove, D., and S. Zack (2014). “Optimism and challenge for science-based conservation of migratory species in and out of U.S. national parks.” Conservation Biology 28(1):4-12.
Sex differences in ecology of wild yaks at high elevation in the Kekexili Reserve, Tibetan Qinghai Plateau, China
Author(s): Berger, J., Cheng, E., Kang, A., Krebs, M., Li, L., Xin Lu, Z., Buqiong, Buzhou, and G.B. Schaller
Year: 2014
Description/Abstract: Extremes in elevation or latitude limit the distribution of terrestrial mammals. In Asia, the largest mammal at high elevations is the endangered wild yak (Bos mutus) in the Tibetan Qinghai Plateau, where vegetation is sparse above ~5,000 m. Given the logistical challenges of high-altitude research, little is known about yak behaviour or patterns of grouping at the limits of plant growth. This study describes the intersexual differences in land use in yaks by concentrating on ecological and social aspects of high-elevation habitats and altitudinal ranges during winter. Further it compares and contrasts the ecology and conservation of wild yaks to closely related North American bison (Bos bison).
Journal/Source: Journal of Mammology
Full Citation: Berger, J., Cheng, E., Kang, A., Krebs, M., Li, L., Xin Lu, Z., Buqiong, Buzhou, and G.B. Schaller (2014). “Sex differences in ecology of wild yaks at high elevation in the Kekexili Reserve, Tibetan Qinghai Plateau, China.” Journal of Mammology 95(3):638-645.
Bison as Keystone Herbivores on the Great Plains
Author(s): Gillian Woolmer
Year: 2010
Journal/Source: WCS Working Paper
Publisher: American Bison Society
Full Citation: Fuhlendorf, Samuel D., Brady W. Allred, and Robert G. Hamilton. 2010. Bison as Keystone Herbivores on the Great Plains: Can Cattle Serve as Proxy for Evolutionary Grazing Patterns?
A Review of Best Practices and Principles for Bison Disease Issues - Greater Yellowstone and Wood Buffalo Areas
Author(s): By John S Nishi
Year: 2010
Description/Abstract: A key challenge that will influence restoration efforts for bison is our collective ability to manage current and future disease risk at a landscape scale. The greater Yellowstone (GYA) and Wood Buffalo areas (GWBA) in the US and Canada are focal points of intense controversy because the wild bison are infected with “reportable” zoonotic pathogens of livestock origin.
Journal/Source: ABS Working Paper No. 3
Publisher: American Bison Society
Full Citation: Nishi, J.S. 2010. A Review of Best Practices and Principles for Bison Disease Issues. ABS Working Paper No. 3.
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